E. Coli Recall

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EMPORIA, Kan. -- Tyson Fresh Meats Inc. is recalling about 131,300 pounds of ground beef that might be contaminated with E. coli. The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced Wednesday that it became aware of the problem when Ohio health authorities reported that a family in Butler County had become ill with E. coli. Ground beef in the family's home tested positive for the bacteria. The products being recalled include Kroger-brand ground beef; Butcher's Brand beef and generic label beef, which were all produced Aug. 23. The Kroger beef was distributed in Tennessee and Indiana; the Butcher's beef in North and South Carolina and the generic beef in Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, New York, Ohio, Tennessee, Texas and Wisconsin. Tyson Foods did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Read more: [url=https://www.newsobserver.com/2011/09/28/1524021/e-coli-scare-prompts-tyson-to.html#ixzz1ZGKvLbKV]https://www.newsobserver.com/2011/09/28/1524021/e-coli-scare-prompts-tyson-to.html#ixzz1ZGKvLbKV[/url]

What Exactly is E. Coli?

E. coli is the name of a germ, or bacterium, that lives in the digestive tracts of humans and animals.You get an E. coli infection by coming into contact with the feces, or stool, of humans or animals. This can happen when you drink water or eat food that has been contaminated by feces. E. coli can get into meat during processing. If the infected meat is not cooked to160¬∞F (71¬∞C), the bacteria can survive and infect you when you eat the meat. This is the most common way people in the United States become infected with E. coli. Any food that has been in contact with raw meat can also become infected through cross contamination. Cross-contamination is the transfer of harmful bacteria to food from other foods, cutting boards, utensils, etc., if they are not handled properly. This is especially true when handling raw meat, poultry, and seafood, so keep these foods and their juices away from already cooked or ready-to-eat foods and fresh produce. When handling foods, it is important to Be Smart, Keep Foods Apart–Don't Cross-Contaminate. By following these simple steps, you can prevent cross-contamination and reduce the risk of foodborne illness. Other foods that can be infected with E. coli include:
  • Raw milk or dairy products. Bacteria can spread from a cow's udders to its milk. Check the labels on dairy products to make sure they contain the word "pasteurized." This means the food has been heated to destroy bacteria.
  • Raw fruits and vegetables, such as lettuce, alfalfa sprouts, or unpasteurized apple cider or other unpasteurized juices that have come in contact with infected animal feces.

Charleston SC E. Coli Lawyers

If you or a member of your family became infected with E. Coli due to eating the recalled meat, you may be able to get compensation for your medical expenses. Contact the Clore Law Group to discuss your E. Coli infection.

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